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The biggest battery breakthroughs of 2019
Posted on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 @ 18:31:28 GMT by vlad

Aux-Equipment
Via NewAtlas: 2019 provided us with a number of battery breakthroughs that could change how we power our grids, our devices and also our modes of transport SergeyNivens/Depositphotos

Many corners of society stand to gain from advances in battery technology, from automakers, to manufacturers of consumer electronics to all that care about the environment. This year offered a little something for everybody with an interest in this area of science, bringing us tech that could charge electric vehicles in 10 minutes, batteries that suck carbon dioxide out of the air and news that the world’s biggest battery is set to get even bigger. Here are the most significant battery breakthroughs of 2019.


Full article: https://newatlas.com/science/battery-breakthroughs-2019/

 
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"The biggest battery breakthroughs of 2019" | Login/Create an Account | 3 comments | Search Discussion
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Re: The biggest battery breakthroughs of 2019 (Score: 1)
by vlad on Monday, January 06, 2020 @ 13:33:44 GMT
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  • Monash University researchers have developed the world’s most efficient lithium-sulphur battery, capable of powering a smartphone for five continuous days.
  • Prototype cells have been developed in Germany. Further testing in cars and solar grids to take place in Australia in 2020.
  • Researchers have a filed patent on the manufacturing process, and will capture a large share of Australia’s lithium chain.

Imagine having access to a battery, which has the potential to power your phone for five continuous days, or enable an electric vehicle to drive more than 1000km without needing to “refuel”.

Monash University researchers are on the brink of commercialising the world’s most efficient lithium-sulphur (Li-S) battery, which could outperform current market leaders by more than four times, and power Australia and other global markets well into the future.

Dr Mahdokht Shaibani from Monash University’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering led an international research team that developed an ultra-high capacity Li-S battery that has better performance and less environmental impact than current lithium-ion products.

The researchers have an approved filed patent (PCT/AU 2019/051239) for their manufacturing process, and prototype cells have been successfully fabricated by German R&D partners Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology.

Some of the world’s largest manufacturers of lithium batteries in China and Europe have expressed interest in upscaling production, with further testing to take place in Australia in early 2020.

The study was published in Science Advances on Saturday, 4 January 2020 – the first research on Li-S batteries to feature in this prestigious international publication.

Professor Mainak Majumder said this development was a breakthrough for Australian industry and could transform the way phones, cars, computers and solar grids are manufactured in the future.

“Successful fabrication and implementation of Li-S batteries in cars and grids will capture a more significant part of the estimated $213 billion value chain of Australian lithium, and will revolutionise the Australian vehicle market and provide all Australians with a cleaner and more reliable energy market,” Professor Majumder said.

“Our research team has received more than $2.5 million in funding from government and international industry partners to trial this battery technology in cars and grids from this year, which we’re most excited about.”

Using the same materials in standard lithium-ion batteries, researchers reconfigured the design of sulphur cathodes so they could accommodate higher stress loads without a drop in overall capacity or performance.

Inspired by unique bridging architecture first recorded in processing detergent powders in the 1970s, the team engineered a method that created bonds between particles to accommodate stress and deliver a level of stability not seen in any battery to date.

Attractive performance, along with lower manufacturing costs, abundant supply of material, ease of processing and reduced environmental footprint make this new battery design attractive for future real-world applications, according to Associate Professor Matthew Hill.

“This approach not only favours high performance metrics and long cycle life, but is also simple and extremely low-cost to manufacture, using water-based processes, and can lead to significant reductions in environmentally hazardous waste,” Associate Professor Hill said.

The research team comprises: Dr Mahdokht Shaibani, Dr Meysam Sharifzadeh Mirshekarloo, Dr M.C. Dilusha Cooray and Professor Mainak Majumder (Monash University); Dr Ruhani Singh, Dr Christopher Easton, Dr Anthony Hollenkamp (CSIRO) and Associate Professor Matthew Hill (CSIRO and Monash University); Nicolas Eshraghi (University of Liege); Dr Thomas Abendroth, Dr Susanne Dorfler, Dr Holger Althues and Professor Stefan Kaskel (Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology).




Self-healing potassium batteries: A cheap, long-life rival to lithium (Score: 1)
by vlad on Tuesday, March 03, 2020 @ 12:37:48 GMT
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Self-healing potassium batteries: A cheap, long-life rival to lithium

Lithium is expensive, environmentally questionable in large volumes, and tends to catch on fire from time to time. It's the best solution we've currently got for EV and device battery storage, but other alternatives are starting to surface, and one that could actually make a fair bit of sense is the potassium metal battery.

As well as being cheap and abundant, potassium tends to be easier to work with, meaning manufacturing costs are lower as well as material costs. Using full potassium metal anodes, batteries can be built with energy densities (both by volume and weight) that are comparable to what lithium offers.

The problem up until now has been one that's been present in lithium batteries as well: dendrite formation. Over time, as the battery is charged and discharged again and again, bits of the metal – ether lithium or potassium – start to attach themselves to the anode. This doesn't happen evenly; little spiky branches called dendrites begin to form, and eventually, they get long enough to poke through the insulating membrane separating the anode from the cathode, and they short circuit the battery. This causes heat build-up and occasionally fires, and effectively reduces the lifespan of a battery...




New high-density lithium battery prototype loves heat, won't explode (Score: 1)
by vlad on Thursday, March 05, 2020 @ 09:46:00 GMT
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Via NewAtlas.com: New high-density lithium battery prototype loves heat, won't explode

If it seems like there's a new battery technology in the news every week or so lately, that's because a ton of research money that's been spent over the past five or ten years is starting to bear fruit. A huge part of our future is electric; that much is clear, and there's room for a bunch of different technologies to move things forward from the status quo, each with its own strengths.

Australia's Deakin University established an entire battery research and development hub back in 2016, dedicated squarely to the advancement of energy storage technology, called BatTRI-Hub. And today, BatTRI-Hub announced it has built a prototype lithium metal battery with some very interesting properties.

The cell in question – a 1Ah flat pouch cell – uses a lithium metal anode, prized for their ability to deliver up to 50 percent more energy storage than today's cells. But it also uses an ionic liquid electrolyte – a salt that's in a liquid form at room temperature, which has several advantages over current mainstream tech.

“Ionic liquids are non-volatile and resistant to catching fire," says Professor Patrick Howlett, director of the research hub, "meaning that unlike the electrolytes currently used in lithium-ion cells used by, for example Samsung and Tesla, they won’t explode. Not only that, but they actually perform better when they heat up, so there’s no need for expensive and cumbersome cooling systems to stop the batteries from overheating.”...




 

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